Lichtenstein was commissioned by Tate Modern to coincide with a major retrospective of the American pop-artist that toured from Tate to the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. It is now part of the Tate Introductions series.
Tate Publishing, 2012

 

 

 

Tarkovsky is a collection of essays exploring the films of Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky. It includes contributions from Jean-Paul Sartre, Marc Forster, James Quandt, Robert Bird, Evgeny Tsymbal and many others.
Black Dog, 2008

PRAISE FOR TARKOVSKY


Read a long review in the London Review of Books

'One of the ten best film books.'
Tim Walker, The Independent

'An impeccably erudite tome.'
Kevin Maher, The Times (UK)

'These essays offer acute and profound insights into Tarkovsky's world.'
Ian Christie, Sight & Sound (Book of the Month)

'The best film book out anywhere in the world right now is Tarkovsky.'
Paul Dale, The List

'A landmark volume on a perpetually elusive filmmaker.'
Tim PalmerFilm International

'Truly breathtaking and of consistently high quality.'
Rebecca Bell-Metereau, Quarterly Review of Film and Video

'A vast book.'
Tereza Stehlikova, The Guardian

'A major homage...Dunne's volume is a sumptuous, beautifully designed visual feast, replete with stills from the gorgeous Tarkovsky repertoire.'
Louis Menashe, Cineaste

'An extraordinary volume.'
Brian Faucette, Film-Philosophy

'Meticulously researched and painstakingly put together.'
Daniel Heller, Grafik Magazine

'Andrei Tarkovsky is captured in all his existential glory in Dunne's richly illustrated book.'
Sarah Fakray, Dazed & Confused

'Lush, beautifully illustrated. Definitely a bit special.'
Helen O'Hara, Empire Magazine

'A remarkable new compendium.'
Michael Spens, Studio International

'Nathan Dunne's 464-page hardcover tome could be called Tarkovsky-in-a-box.'
Chris Chang, Film Comment

'A deluxe anthology.'
J. Hoberman, Bookforum

'Weighing in at nearly 500 pages, the book is more than a good-looking door stop.'
Tim Robey, The Telegraph

'A visually ravishing discourse of Tarkovsky's art-house classics.'
Howard Maxford, Film Review